I’m your typical college student. I study a lot. I work hard. I’m socializing a lot, but it seems like I have been zapped of all of my energy in recent weeks. Being tired is an understatement. My weekend consists of lying in bed sleeping rather than going out and socializing or even studying.

My doctor didn’t find anything physically wrong with me, but I’m still drained.

I’ve been thinking of taking supplements. Do the experts have any recommendations on supplements or nootropics that I can try?

A lot of people are saying the same thing: I’m exhausted. It may be that people are just doing a lot more than they normally would, but diet and sleep play a major role in the equation, too. When your diet is off and you’re hardly sleeping, you’ll eventually get worn out and reach a point where you’re just a slug.

Sleep should be your first, go-to way to help your body fight off these bouts of exhaustion. It's important that you sleep 7 hours or more per night, but you don’t want to sleep 14 or 15 hours either. Studies show that everyone is different, but a good number of hours to sleep is between 7 and 8.

If you sleep 9 or 10 hours during this time, that’s also fine.

Once you’re sleeping properly, try eating better, too. Cut out those high carbohydrate foods that will cause you to crash. These foods have such fast-acting carbs that they’ll spike your insulin then put you on a rollercoaster of an energy dip.

It's better to be able to sustain your energy levels. Try eating “clean,” and by this, I mean cutting out those quick carbs and fried foods. Eat better for a week and see how your body reacts. A lot of people will notice a major change in their mood and energy levels almost instantly because they’re eating so much better.

Pack in vegetables and complex carbs, such as a baked potato, which will be able to supply you with energy over time. When you want to reach for pasta, choose quinoa or another grain instead that will not cause your insulin levels to jump and drop in the process.

Supplements should be your next course of action, and nootropics are great for students. You'll find that if you visit Lpath.com, you’ll be able to learn all about kratom. This supplement is one that I advise you use with caution and in small doses until you see how it reacts with your body.

Kratom is known for providing you with a massive energy boost, and it’s also a great option for anyone who is suffering with pain.

While Kratom has a lot of promising benefits, it’s one of the world’s best energy boosters, too. There are different types of Kratom, such as the Thai Kratom which is grown in Thailand and is used specifically for people with low energy. You'll be able to use this as an herbal energy booster thanks to the high levels of mitragynine in it. 

You'll feel happier and more upbeat after taking Kratom. You'll also find that you’ll have more mental clarity and be able to focus more. Students will find that this supplement is being used a lot around campus, but I recommend using it as a “supplement” and not a cure. You should also be doing other things to keep your energy levels high, including finding ways to alleviate stress and exercising.

Exercising, over the long-term, is one of the best methods of increasing energy and will also be able to strengthen your bones, muscles and cardiovascular system at the same time.

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